Saturday, 24 December 2011

Happy Christmas



A Happy Christmas and a good 2012 to all my 


readers and followers!




Friday, 23 December 2011

EddieGubbins: Running After Maria

EddieGubbins: Running After Maria: Running After Maria Have now edited and approved Running After Maria my tragic romance novel. It is now available in paperback from...

Running After Maria

Running After Maria





Have now edited and approved 

Running After Maria my tragic romance novel.

It is now available in paperback from 

www.createspace.com 

and 

www.amazon.com




James Ashleigh went to sea after leaving school and began to live what turned out to be, for him, the ideal life. Plenty of money, plenty of women and drink and visiting places only read about in books. The ideal life for somebody in their mid twenties with nothing to hold them in one place. Then one day at a party on one of ship on which he was an officer, in port in Finland, he meets Maria and life's complications start.

This is the story of one man’s descent into depression after tragedy strikes, his anger at other people trying to help and his redemption in the arms of somebody who admired the dedication of other people who try to help. It explores the question of whether a person can really be saved after a devastating loss especially of somebody that person loves deeply? Does not their world and the will to live end?

It is available from Amazon as an ebook for download to Kindle and all other electronic platforms including a PC or Mac.

Friday, 9 December 2011

EddieGubbins: Kindle Owners Lending Library

EddieGubbins: Kindle Owners Lending Library: To all Kindle owners. My books: A Ceremony of Innocence An Ordinary Life The Teacher of the Rombuli ...

Kindle Owners Lending Library

To all Kindle owners.

My books:
A Ceremony of Innocence












An Ordinary Life










The Teacher of the Rombuli


















can now be lent free from the Kindle owners lending library.

See Amazon.com for details.

Sunday, 4 December 2011

Running After Maria





Had my review copy of Running After Maria and
 it had to be re-edited. Now waiting for the new
 version to review and approve

Hopefully not too long before
 
it is available for sale!




See www.createspace.com for details and availability of my 

Fantasy Novel The Teacher of the Rombuli.

Saturday, 26 November 2011

Brotherly Love



      

I have transfered this 


novel from smashwords to 


Kindle. It can be 


downloaded from Amazon 


for $3.99 straight to your 


Kindle nor PC. 


With an app., it can be 


downloaded to iPad and other platforms.


Have a good read!



      





Brotherly Love by Edmund J Gubbins
Ken Flood lived a quiet life with his wife and two daughters in Plymouth, working as a lecturer in the University, minding his own business and relatively happy and content. Out of loyalty to his brother he enters a world for which he has no experience. On the run from enemies he does not know, fearful and scared out of his mind. Running, moving, never staying in one place, not knowing to whom to turn for help. Never sure which men or women are on his side or against him. Not even sure of which side his brother is on. Wondering whether his brother his using him for purposes he has no control over. In the end, doubting his brother's motives.

It is a story of fear, of somebody out of their depth in a world made strange, of chance encounters with people willing to help, of finding hidden depths behind a placid exterior and of the extent which loyalty to ones family can led on down paths best left unexplored.


Wednesday, 16 November 2011

Running After Maria




Running after Maria
by
Eddie Gubbins


Published as an ebook for downloading a on Kindle

James Ashleigh went to sea after leaving school and began to live what turned out to be, for him, the ideal life. Plenty of money, plenty of women and drink and visiting places only read about in books. The ideal life for somebody in their mid twenties with nothing to hold them in one place. Then one day at a party on one of ship on which he was an officer, in port in Finland, he meets Maria and life's complications start.

This is the story of one man’s descent into depression after tragedy strikes, his anger at other people trying to help and his redemption in the arms of somebody who admired the dedication of other people who try to help. It explores the question of whether a person can really be saved after a devastating loss especially of somebody that person loves deeply? Does not their world and the will to live end?

It can be downloaded through Amazon for Kindle, PC, Mac, iPad and other platforms.

It will be available soon as a paper back through www.createspace.com and www. amazon.com.

Friday, 11 November 2011

An Ordinary Life by Edmund J Gubbins


An Ordinary Life by Edmund J Gubbins
Money laundering is illegal. Even Tom Houseman knows that. He, as an academic, makes a distinction between helping somebody to set up legitimate business and the source of the money.
The novel follows the life of Tom Houseman. From his early childhood on the edge of a hard council estate to eminent Professor with a worldwide reputation and great wealth. The story explores the manner in which most people regard themselves as honest and law abiding although there are times and circumstances when they ignore the rules of behaviour or of some moral code. These people justify their actions by ignoring their conscience or making excuses for their behaviour. In extreme cases they give the impression that morality is not an issue in their case.
Tom Houseman has a boyhood friend called Derek from the council estate and, though their paths diverge after junior school, he stays loyal to his friend. Derek becomes the right hand man of the criminal Mr. Big and introduces Edward. During his life, Edward accepts opportunities presented by his friends and his brother. These enhance both his standing in society and his wealth. All the time, he ignores and denies the moral and legal implications of taking advantage of these offers. As time passes, he has to accept the implications of his choices.
Will he finally have to face these hard decisions or will he sail serenely on living, to him, this ordinary life?

Buy this book as a paperback through Amazon.
Download via Kindle and Amazon onto your PC, Mac or other platforms.

Wednesday, 9 November 2011

Anti-capitalism protest

I have a great deal of sympathy with some of the sentiments of the anti-capitalism movement. However, there are aspects which are rather way off the mark. there are many factors wrong with free markets but we have to be logical about the way markets have been instrumental in the rising prosperity of even the poorest in the world. My living standards are much higher than those of my parents. Our generation have more choices in life than our parents did. Because of the way free markets work, research and development has brought us greater health and longer life. We have to choice of better food and better houses. can those living in tents outside St Paul's have had to huddle round a coal fire for warmth, shivering in the draughts of their living rooms. Have they had to rush down stairs in the morning to get dressed in front of the fire for warmth? Were do they get their money from because the benefits they collect can only be paid because most people are employed in private industry paying taxes. ``It is not their money but mine and yours. The protest they have mounted is laughable. The direct result has had no effect what so ever on the financial businesses but has resulted in the closure of one of our major churches. They have caused problems for the very people that support their motives.
Capitalism is not bad but it is neutral. It has brought great wealth to this country and its people.What is wrong is how the rewards are distributed. Ordinary people are fed up with the unfairness of the system. They laugh hollowly at the defenders of the system who are rich. How is it that somebody can earn a bonus of £3m while others are put on the dole? Those at the top do not seem to appreciate the anger of those ordinary people. They think their rewards are justified. In addition they claim that they are on performance related pay. However this does not appear to decrease even if their performance ids bad and leads the company into trouble. Even when they resign because the company is losing money, they go away with large amounts of cash. BUT it is not just at the top. Many hard working people cannot understand how anybody can claim that they are entitled to benefits. Hard working people are fed up with those who make false claims to defraud the state. How can somebody be on the dole or other benefits for years?
It is he attitude of people which is the problem. Most people regard what they do as honest. They make excuses for their actions and use various justifications for what they do. In many ways what is wrong with capitalism is the attitudes of people and the way the system is upheld.
It has to be considered that over the centuries, many revolutions and civil wars have been caused by the uneven distribution of the wealth generated by industries. If we sre to avoid falling into the trap of revolution and dictatorship, we have to find a way of getting a more even distribution of wealth.

(My novel An Ordinary Life explores the way some people justify their actions and how in the end they have to confront what they do.)

Monday, 7 November 2011

The Teacher of the Rombuli








My novel, The Teacher Of The Rombuli   is now available as a paper back through                              



CreateSpace







price $10.99




It can be ordered from www.createspace.com and Amazon.










This is in addition to the ebook for Kindle and other platforms available from Amazon £2.85.

Monday, 31 October 2011

Brotherly Love

      




      





Brotherly Love by Edmund J Gubbins
Ken Flood lived a quiet life with his wife and two daughters in Plymouth, working as a lecturer in the University, minding his own business and relatively happy and content. Out of loyalty to his brother he enters a world for which he has no experience. On the run from enemies he does not know, fearful and scared out of his mind. Running, moving, never staying in one place, not knowing to whom to turn for help. Never sure which men or women are on his side or against him. Not even sure of which side his brother is on. Wondering whether his brother his using him for purposes he has no control over. In the end, doubting his brother's motives.

It is a story of fear, of somebody out of their depth in a world made strange, of chance encounters with people willing to help, of finding hidden depths behind a placid exterior and of the extent which loyalty to ones family can led on down paths best left unexplored.

Read this thriller by downloading to your iPad, Kimble or computer etc. from:
 www.smashwords.com 
for the bargain price of $1.99.

Friday, 28 October 2011

Running After Maria

Running After Maria


Running after Maria

by

Eddie Gubbins


Published as an ebook for downloading at:

www.smashwords.com

James Ashleigh went to sea after leaving school and began to live what turned out to be, for him, the ideal life. Plenty of money, plenty of women and drink and visiting places only read about in books. The ideal life for somebody in their mid twenties with nothing to hold them in one place. Then one day at a party on one of ship on which he was an officer, in port in Finland, he meets Maria and life's complications start.

This is the story of one man’s descent into depression after tragedy strikes, his anger at other people trying to help and his redemption in the arms of somebody who admired the dedication of other people who try to help. It explores the question of whether a person can really be saved after a devastating loss especially of somebody that person loves deeply? Does not their world and the will to live end?

A Ceremony of Innocence

A Ceremony of Innocence by Eddie Gubbins


My novel A Ceremony of Innocence has now been posted as an ebook on Kindle. It can be downloaded for $3.99 from Amazon with apps for
iPad and other platforms








Set against the political and industrial strife of the 1980's, this is a story  follows the lives of one family during one summer in 1981. 
Joan Brookes, the mother, is excited because her two sons will be back home together for the holidays, something that has not happened for what seems to her an age. All she wants for the holiday is her house filled with laughter, conversation and joy. In anticipation of the holiday she is happy.
Her husband Charlie is a shop steward at the Brents shipyard and at the same time as her boys are arriving home, there are redundancies announced at the shipyard. The workers led by Charlie vote to strike at the same time as his sons arrive home on holiday.
Jim, her youngest son is to graduate that summer from university with a first class honours degree making her feel proud and happy.  Left wing and loyal to his friends, Jim wants only to help his father in what he sees as the struggle for justice. Jim thinks of his brother as left wing and shy from the little he remembers of him when they were together at school ten years before. From this stand point Jim thinks his brother will help with the strike.
Mark, her oldest son, wants a quiet life while on leave from his travels as an officer in the merchant navy. He is skeptical about the strike and its effects on the community although he supports his father. Mark feels that because time is short while he is at home, he has to grab any opportunity for gain or happiness that comes his way. He is not prepared to subordinate his pleasure for the sake of the family over something that he sees as none of his business.
Against the background of the strike, Jim painfully finds out what his brother is like and is annoyed that Mark has enough friends to help Jim out of a brush with the law when the rest of the family were helpless.
What will be the climax, reconciliation or a final fractured relationship.
Can the brothers find a way to compromise their positions and fulfil their mother’s wish for a happy few weeks or will their anger boil over into open conflict and family break up?

Download it now for a good read.

Wednesday, 19 October 2011

Loyalty in Football

How can we talk about loyalty in football in the light of Steve Coteral's leaving Portsmouth for Nottingham Forest? The next time he rants about the loyalty of player under his management he should think deeply about his record of loyalty. He was at Notts County for a few months but as soon as he was asked to move he moved. Now he has abandoned Portsmouth for Forest.
The only loyalty in football is the fans. Most turn up to support their local team come rain come shine. They suffer the good times and they rejoice in the good. For most they know that they have to enjoy the good because as night follows day, there will come a time when things turn bad. I can remember when even the mighty Liverpool of today languished in the lower reaches of the old second division. Chelsea, Aston Villa, Man united have also had to endure those times. During the dark days of bottom of the table, loss after loss, I have sat in the pub with my friends wondering whether to have another pint or go to the match. Of course as true fans, we have gone to the match full of hope that it will get better. The Rooney's and Teveses of this world would do well to think of the fans when they make their exaggerated claims that they should move.
It is all about money. AND now we have those  ignorant Americans coming here and demanding that all the history and tradition be thrown out of the window. They want to stop promotion and relegation so that they can protect their investment. It is the NFL model. I have never understood how people who made their money through capitalism and competition can be so communistic when it comes to sport. They will condemn foreign companies for trying to protect their businesses by co-operation or state subsidies. When it comes to two things the Americans are more socialist than left government countries. They pour subsidies into agriculture, build barriers against foreign imports and suppress competition in sport.
If you do not accept our systems take your money back home. The dream of mixing with the big boys is what drives football in England from the park team to the football league. It should be preserved!

The oldies are of no consequence!

So they want to force the oldies to give up their houses and move to smaller ones. This is so that younger people with families can then move into those houses. We are to be treated like discards of society no longer wanted, to be herded into whatever the state thinks is best for the young. They say it is because there are millions of spare rooms in houses of the elderly sitting empty in the whole country. These could be put to better use.
Houses are not commodities to many people but homes. They contain memories, they have been decorated and organised to fit families and they are comfortable and familiar. In addition for many people they are located in the right place with neighbours and friends. They are the fabric of living to many elderly people. 
It smacks a little of what used to happen in communist states in that the authorities think they can order their citizens lives in ways that the authorities think is best.
Besides it is not only the old who live in houses with spare rooms. I know several younger people who live on their own in three bed roomed houses. There are married couples without children in similar situations. Should they be made to move into more appropriate accommodation? The worst example is the Queen. Surely she does not need all those rooms at Windsor. Buckingham Palace, Sandringham, Balmoral? Or what about the Duke of Devonshire at Chatsworth. Should he be made to move? I doubt it because there will be one rule for the rich gang and another for the poor.
Besides, many elderly people living in houses with vacant rooms suddenly find those rooms essential when their families come to visit. 
The authorities should make sure that all the houses left vacant by owners are put back into use before trying to bludgeon the elderly into giving up their homes.